Tennessee Clears $3 Billion In All-Time Sports Betting Handle

State becomes eighth to reach $3B mark with $342 million wagered in December
Tennessee 2021 December revenue
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Tennessee became the eighth state in the post-PASPA era to surpass $3 billion in sports betting handle after the Sports Wagering Advisory Council reported a handle of approximately $341.8 million Friday.

That handle was the third-largest of the 14 months the Volunteer State has been accepting wagers and marked the end of its most active quarter, as the final three months saw bettors place nearly $1.1 billion worth of bets — just shy of doubling the previous three-month period.

The December handle represented a 6.5% decline from November’s total of $365.7 million, but was also an 88.9% year-over-year improvement from the nearly $181 million handle generated in the final month of 2020. Overall, Tennessee operators accepted more than $2.7 billion in wagers for 2021, which is currently ninth among all states.

Bettors had a notably better month than November, as operators reported $24.6 million in gross revenue from a 7.2% win rate. That was the second-lowest hold recorded since launch, ahead of only the 6.1% in October. Gross revenue declined one-third from November’s record haul of $36.9 million, while the adjusted revenue total of $16.5 million was a 44.3% drop from the previous month.

Operators grossed more than $239.2 million in revenue for the calendar year on the strength of an 8.8% win rate. When accounting for promotional play and other deductions, the state was able to levy a 20% tax on nearly $197.6 million of operator revenue.

The state collected $3.3 million in tax receipts for December and finished the year with slightly more than $39.5 million generated through sports wagering. Tennessee’s tax rate on adjusted revenue — among the highest in the nation — will help the state likely place no lower than fourth for tax revenue among legal jurisdictions, behind only Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Illinois.

Photo: Sean Pavone/Shutterstock

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